floydcountytimes.com

Schools look ahead to sequester cuts

Jack Lattajlatta@civitasmedia.com

March 5, 2013

Following the passing of last week’s sequester deadline in Washington D.C., Floyd County School officials are faced with the unenviable task of deciding from where new cuts to education programs come.


Floyd County Schools Supt. Henry Webb said Tuesday that nothing is definitive in regard to the cuts, but the board is anticipating a 5 percent cut to the current year’s head start, Title 1 and 2 programs, and special education funding. Beginning in September, Webb says they are being told it will be 9 percent across the board in the title programs.


“We’re looking at over $500,000 being cut, which is significant for us,” Webb said. “That’s resources and staff, so it’s significant. What makes it bad, or worse, is this is on top of all the other cuts we’re dealing with.”


According to Webb, the board has just begun to break down the figures, and doesn’t know yet from where all the cuts will be made, or when the 5 percent cuts will take affect.


“We’re beginning to look at numbers and getting guidance,” Webb said. “We are starting to look at where this money is going to come from. Our schools are going to have to make some of those decisions, too, because they’re going to be getting less money.”


Webb says the board is preparing for the cuts, but is hoping that Congress may yet act to prevent the loss in funding.


“We’re still hoping something will happen to help minimize these cuts going forward. We’re still hopeful that Congress will do something. I don’t know why, but we are.”


According to Webb, as more information becomes available, they will be sending out information to let Floyd County students, parents and teachers know what is happening going forward.


The sequester cuts were originally part of the Budget Control Act of 2011 (BCA), which was better known as the debt ceiling compromise. The BCA was intended to serve as a harsh incentive to force the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction to arrive at a deal whereby $1.5 trillion would be cut from the federal deficit over a period of 10 years.