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‘The Gingerdead Man 2: The Passion of the Crust’

Tom Doty Times Columnist

November 8, 2013

Bad taste rules as a killer cookie runs amok on the set of a low-budget horror flick, in this zany follow up to the Gary Busey classic .


If you never saw the original film, then don’t sweat it, as this opens with a five-minute recap of the original. Basically, they show all of the kill scenes from the first one, as well as a ton of Gary Busey footage. He was cast as a serial killer, with the unfortunate handle of Millard Findelmeyer, who dies in a bakery shootout with cops, but not before transferring his essence into some cookie dough.


If this sounds like a rip off of “Child’s Play,” then you are an astute horror fan who would have passed the killer quiz in the opening of “Scream.”


Apparently even Gary can screw up a free lunch and opted not to supply his voice for this sequel. Kind of a stupid decision, really, as he would have cleared a few grand for one day’s work reading lines into a tape recorder. But, then again, this is the guy who got on his high horse about not wearing a motorcycle helmet after he incurred brain injury for following his own questionable policy.


The sequel finds our Gingerdead dude transported to the set of a killer puppet movie (“Tiny Terrors 9”) inside a box of stale doughnuts. He proves indigestible and is hastily dropped to the floor, where he begins his reign of terror. He needs the blood of a virgin to transfer his soul into a larger vessel, but such an animal proves hard to find in casting couch land.


Meanwhile, the movie is in trouble. The head of the studio is overextended and his latest puppet opus is being savaged by an online critic before it is even filmed. Then there is the set visit by a terminally-ill movie fan, effects that are proving clunky, and, let’s not forget, the threat of a certain baked good.


It all leads to another round of killings as the Gingerdead guy wipes out the cast and crew in a desperate search for an unsullied victim that will give him the energy boost he needs to take over a more substantial body. That is all the plot this movie can muster, but it is enough to make it rise for the occasion.


Things happen fast here and it is all over by the 72-minute mark, with most of the cast splattered all over the sets. The final battle pits our evil edible against the prop puppets from the film he is hijacking, who have now become animated and very, very angry. It’s a delightful showdown that ends with the oven door wide open for another round of deadly dessert.


This works thanks to speedy pacing and a gross but clever send up of low-budget horror by the people who do it for a living. The film is chock full of clever cameos by talented folks who got their start in 1980s horror, like Scream Queen Michelle Bauer, director David Decoteau, and effects wizard Greg Kurtzman (who now produces and directs episodes of “The Walking Dead”). The opening credits are a riot and feature a hilarious theme song, “Run, Run,” that is played to the tune of “Bad Reputation.”


The best news is the flick will only set you back five bucks (about what it cost to make it I bet), if you buy it as part of the “Midnight Horrors Collection.” The set also includes seven other horror/comedies, such as “Ghoulies 4” and “Children of the Corn V.” Bon appetit.


Best line: “Pain is temporary, film is forever.”


2005, unrated.