UPIKE presenting Joseph Simcox and ‘Shamans, Desert Men and the New World of Food’


Staff Report



PIKEVILLE – Botanical Explorer and ethnobotanist Joseph Simcox has traveled the globe in what he calls “a mad pursuit to document the edibles of this good earth.”

Also known as a world food plant ecologist, he has trekked through more than 100 countries on expeditions to study the diversity of edibles, bridging the past with the modern world.

“Mother Nature is good,” said Simcox. “There is food out there for the future and the intrigue to keep us entertained, all we have to do is search it out.”

The University of Pikeville will host Simcox on Thursday, March 31, at 7 p.m. in Booth Auditorium, Record Memorial Building, on the UPIKE campus. His presentation, “Shamans, Desert Men and the New World of Food,” is offered in conjunction with the Appalachian Seed Swap set for April 2 in Pikeville, an event expected to draw hundreds interested in selling, trading and saving heirloom seeds and learning about food preservation.

“We are excited to host such a renowned seed preservationist as Mr. Simcox, and his involvement with the Appalachian Seed Swap highlights Appalachia’s importance to plant diversity,” said Cathy Rehmeyer, Ph.D., associate professor of pathology at the Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Our ancestors developed a rich agricultural legacy, leaving us more varieties of beans and apples than anywhere else in North America. Mr. Simcox’s presentation will provide a fascinating overview of his botanical explorations and discoveries, reminding us all of agriculture’s important role in culture and community, both here and abroad.”

The March 31 event is free and the campus and community are cordially invited.

Staff Report

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