UPIKE hosts artist-in-residence


Staff Report



Artist-in-Residence Bill Heise, left, works with UPIKE student Kelsie Williams, of Marrowbone, in the stained glass workshop set up on campus. Also pictured, Jennifer Burton, of Mullins.


PIKEVILLE – University of Pikeville students have the opportunity to learn an artistic skill set that is not typically taught within art courses on campus. Artist-in-residence Bill Heise has set up a workshop in the Weber Gallery at UPIKE to share his creativity and skill set in creating handmade stained glass.

Heise is not a career artist but rather found his way to the craft during retirement. His diverse professional career includes 20 years of service in the U.S. Air Force and Army, business owner, educator and customer service consultant. Now retired, Heise resides at Robinson Creek and, at the age of 62, he has become a journeyman in the craft of handmade stained glass.

The artist-in-residence program allows Heise to spend time away from his usual environment and provides the campus and community an opportunity to experience the art of stained glass through the work of a local craftsman.

“I want to share how to create the projects and teach the basics to others,” said Heise. “What a blessing to be able to share. I believe it is spreading good will and that makes me smile.”

Workshops are available to students, faculty, staff and the community on Mondays and Tuesdays from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Wednesdays and Thursdays from noon- 4 p.m. through October. The six-hour workshop is $60 and includes all materials.

“What is so wonderful about this month-long event is that our community will be exposed to the process of how stained glass is created by working with and speaking directly to the artist,” said Patricia Kowalok, chair of the division of humanities and professor of art. “The act of cutting glass and soldering it together brings a new level of appreciation when looking at such works of art.”

The community is invited to meet Heise on Saturday, Oct. 15, from 9-11 a.m., in the workshop set up in Weber Art Gallery. Heise will also discuss his artwork and the history of stained glass during a lecture, “Stained Glass as an Artform,” on Thursday, Oct. 20, at 6 p.m., in Booth Auditorium. The community is cordially invited to attend both events.

“There are numerous talented artisans in Eastern Kentucky and this great state,” said Heise. “Our region needs to be made aware of local talent who are available for all to enjoy.”

The artist-in-residence program is part of the university’s yearlong “Humanities on the Hill” celebration.

The Weber art gallery is located on the second floor of the Record Memorial Building at the University of Pikeville. Gallery hours are Monday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and 4:15-5:15 p.m.; Tuesday from 8:30 a.m.-noon and 1:30-5 p.m.; Wednesday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and 4:15-5:15 p.m.; Thursday from 8:30 a.m.-noon and 1:30-5 p.m.; and Friday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information contact Kowalok at (606) 218-5758 or Petra Carroll at (606) 218-5759. Contact Heise at (606) 794-3396, 1950bh@gmail.com or Sunnydale Acres Stain Glass on Facebook.

Artist-in-Residence Bill Heise, left, works with UPIKE student Kelsie Williams, of Marrowbone, in the stained glass workshop set up on campus. Also pictured, Jennifer Burton, of Mullins.
http://floydcountytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_artist-in-residence.jpgArtist-in-Residence Bill Heise, left, works with UPIKE student Kelsie Williams, of Marrowbone, in the stained glass workshop set up on campus. Also pictured, Jennifer Burton, of Mullins.

Staff Report

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